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Archive for the ‘Afghanistan, Kandahar’ Category

MILNEWS.ca News Highlights – April 17, 2014

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17 April 14 at 21:00

MILNEWS.ca News Highlights – April 10, 2014

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Written by milnewsca

10 April 14 at 20:00

MILNEWS.ca News Highlights – April 7, 2014

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MILNEWS.ca News Highlights – April 6, 2014

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MILNEWS.ca News Highlights – April 4, 2014

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MILNEWS.ca News Highlights – April 1, 2014

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MILNEWS.ca News Highlights – March 31, 2014

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Written by milnewsca

31 March 14 at 22:30

MILNEWS.ca News Highlights – March 30, 2014

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  • Fire-damaged HMCS Protecteur will return to CFB Esquimalt by late May, ship Cmdr. Julian Elbourne said Friday.  “We’re aiming to leave by the end of April,” Elbourne said from Pearl Harbor, where the Royal Canadian Navy supply ship is being prepared for the journey.  “Everyone is keen to get home.”  The date of departure is yet to be determined.  Protecteur is being emptied and secured to be towed back to Canada by the ocean tug USNS Salvor. It will be unmanned for the tow, attached with steel-wire cables. Valuables from the ship, including a helicopter, have been or will be shipped back to Esquimalt. The journey, about 4,300 kilometres, is expected to take three to four weeks.  Elbourne said the last of the crew will fly home a few days after Protecteur leaves the U.S. port. The ship was towed there a week after a Feb. 27 fire left it dead in the water about 630 kilometres from Pearl Harbor in the North Pacific.  There are 179 of the 279 ship’s crew alongside Protecteur in Hawaii, living in floating barracks while they prepare the ship for travel ….”
  • Ukraine  Commentary  “For Stephen Harper, the intersection between foreign policy and Canada’s economic interests is usually within easy reach.  But during a six-day sojourn through three countries in the midst of a crisis in Crimea which has echoes of the worst days of the Cold War, the prime minister has carefully kept daylight between his pro-Ukrainian, anti-Russian views and potential new markets for Canadian resources.  In short, he cannot allow the fear coursing through Ukraine and an illegal Russian occupation to look like a selling opportunity for Canada, although that’s what it could certainly become, even if further down the road ….”
  • “Canada’s embattled veterans affairs minister will soon unveil a pilot project to offset some costs for service dogs for injured Afghan war veterans, CTV News has learned.  Julian Fantino hinted to CTV News that he expects to announce details later next next month.  “We’re looking at how to move the yard stick forward in a way we can provide benefits,” Fantino said. “We can’t do everything but some of these things are moving along, and service dogs are one of them.”  Sources in Veterans Affairs confirm the plan is in the works but won’t release a dollar figure. One dog can cost up to $15,000 and take three years to train, depending on what services it needs to provide.  The Harper government has been studying the benefits of service dogs for years. The department commissioned a report from a group studying veterans’ health at Queen’s University, and that report was received by the department earlier this week. Its recommendations have not been released ….”
  • Veterans who testified at a Commons committee this week say the parliamentary secretary for Veterans Affairs was more interested in exploring their backgrounds and whether they had ulterior motives than hearing their views on improving compensation for ex-military personnelParm Gill, who is also the Conservative MP for Brampton-Springdale, queried three leaders of the Canadian Veterans Advocacy – a four-year-old group that has often been critical of the government’s treatment of veterans – about their service, their alleged ties to a union, and their political affiliation ….”
  • Commentary  “…. Apologies that resonate have several basic characteristics. They begin with a clear statement of what went wrong. They take responsibility for the failure and do so promptly, without being pushed.  Part of taking responsibility is saying sorry for offensive behaviour or inconvenience — with no “buts” or “ifs.” A meaningful apology usually involves some form of reparation speedily rendered. Finally, an expression of gratitude for the support of customers, voters or whatever group was harmed.  Using these criteria, here are some of the best and worst political apologies of the last year …. Veterans Affairs Minister Julian Fantino didn’t fare well after his belligerent slanging match with veterans over the closure of offices across the country. When the veterans’ plight gained public traction, Fantino headed to the House. There he delivered a flat, insincere apology read from cue cards.  He said the standoff was caused by the behind-the-scenes influence of big unions on the vets. Blaming the standoff on others and offering no remedy has further undermined the government’s relationship with veterans ….”
  • Afghanistan  From our “hindsight is 20-20″ file …. “With Canada’s mission in Afghanistan finally in the past, former defence minister Peter MacKay has acknowledged the government could have done more for its soldiers.  In a sober interview on CBC Radio’s The House, MacKay said a mission as complex as Afghanistan “always causes pause for reflection.”  MacKay said he wished, in some ways, that Canada had “provided more equipment, helicopters, mine-clearing equipment in the early days.  I don’t think the ferocity of the mission perhaps dawned on even military leaders, let alone political leaders of two different governments,” he said.  “In retrospect, we could have perhaps prepared our soldiers better through both equipment and training.” ….”
  • Canadian war veterans, particularly those soldiers who never returned home, have long held a special place in the hearts and minds of a grateful Dutch citizenry, including those of future generations unblemished by the horrors of warOne such touching tribute, a relatively new initiative instituted in 1991, remembers and honours Canadian servicemen buried in a sprawling Second World War cemetery near the tiny forested village of Holten.  On each Christmas Eve, approximately 1,500 locals, including 300 schoolchildren, congregate at the Holten Canadian War Cemetery, the second largest of its kind in the Netherlands. They commemorate those who died helping to liberate the country from four years of Nazi occupation.  Following a solemn ceremony, wind- and rain-resistant candles are lit and placed at the base of each bone-white headstone ….”

Written by milnewsca

30 March 14 at 17:30

MILNEWS.ca News Highlights – March 28, 2014

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MILNEWS.ca News Highlights – March 27, 2014

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