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MILNEWS.ca News Highlights – July 23, 2013

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Written by milnewsca

23 July 13 at 7:45

MILNEWS.ca News Highlights – July 19, 2013

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  • The Department of National Defence has quietly decided to no longer post key technical documents on its website detailing the military’s requirements for crucial new planes, ships, and vehicles, instead opting for new slimmed-down versions.  The document, called a Statement of Operational Requirements, used to be drawn up when the military wanted to buy a new item. They would detail what the military wanted in a given piece of equipment. The documents have previously been released publicly so Canadians could examine what their armed forces needed before their tax dollars were spent.  Such documents, for example, have been posted on DND’s website to show the military’s requirements for a new strategic airlift capability, or what it required in terms of new resupply ships or new Arctic patrol ships, now part of the government’s $35-billion shipbuilding strategy. But such documents can no longer be found online.  “Since March of this year, current direction within the [Royal Canadian Air Force] is to hold onto Statements of Operational Requirements until the tendering process has been completed,” wrote RCAF spokesperson Maj. James Simiana in an email.  “The intent by doing so is to ensure that planning projections which may change do not influence the formal acquisition process.” ….”
  • Every time he picked up a pen to sign a letter of condolence to the family of a dead soldier, Lt.-Gen. Peter Devlin asked himself hard, painful questions about the institution to which he had devoted his life.  During Devlin’s three years as the country’s top soldier, there were an awful lot of those letters to sign. Stacks of his briefing notes are laced with censored references to the letters.  Whether it was in combat, by accident or by suicide, there was always a moment of reflection before pen went to paper, he said. But when the soldier’s death was self-inflicted, the questions seemed to loom larger.  “It hurts,” said Devlin, who retires Thursday as the commander of the Canadian Army. “I wonder about whether we, the army and the Canadian Forces did all that we could have, (and) should have.”  Just recently, the Canadian military quietly added two more soldiers to the list of those who killed themselves in 2011, according to internal National Defence records.  Twenty-two soldiers have now been declared as having died by suicide the same year the army ended its combat mission in Afghanistan, says the military’s latest report on suicide in its ranks.  The study, which looked back at data over a decade, concluded the war in Afghanistan — or any deployment, for that matter — isn’t a risk factor for suicide and that the overall rate of serving soldiers who kill themselves remains steady ….” - more here
  • Afghanistan  His Excellency Ambassador Glenn Davidson presented Canada’s Meritorious Service Medal to Afghan National Army Brigadier Generals Ahmad Habibi and Ahmad Shah July 1 at the Afghan Ministry of Defense headquarters compound in Kabul, Afghanistan …. The medal recognizes a military deed or activity performed in a highly professional manner that brings benefit or honor to the Canadian Forces. Afghan Army leaders and family members attended the pinning event. Both generals gave speeches of thanks and talked about the future of the Afghan National Security Forces ….”
  • More Canadian Army identity awesomeness!  “…. The new primary badge of the Canadian Army is based on a badge used prior to the unification of the Canadian Armed Forces in 1968, but encased in a more recent version of the badge frame. It features crossed swords, which symbolize the history of the Canadian Army as one team working together in the defence of Canada. The three maple leaves, conjoined on one stem, are taken from the Royal Arms of Canada, and represent service to Canada, service to our sovereign, and the heritage of the Canadian Army.  The visual identifier, derived from the primary badge, features a crown atop the maple leaves and swords, as well as the words “Canadian Army” in both official languages. The new tagline – Strong. Proud. Ready. – echoes organizational values and underscores the importance of readiness for full-spectrum operations ….” – pictures of the new graphics here
  • From the Pentagon Info-machine  “Death by PowerPoint. A phrase many soldiers don’t like to hear when it comes to training. At McGregor Range Complex in New Mexico, Exercise Guardian Justice is underway with more than 220 U.S. Army Reserve soldiers and members of the Canadian military.  The training exercise, which focuses on training military police units on detainee operations, kicked off July 16, 2013, with two days of classes filled with presentations covering everything from the history of detainee operations to the Geneva Convention, law of war, rules of engagement and much more.  The soldiers participating in the exercise go through 12 days of actual training with two days of classroom training, nine days of hands-on training and a recreation day to wrap it all up ….”
  • From the CF Info-machine (almost six weeks after the end of the exercise)  “From 6 May to 8 June, approximately 7,500 Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) members from across the country participated in the fifth and final stage of JOINTEX 13, a multi-stage joint training exercise meant to change the way the CAF train and fight.  The first in a series of nation-wide joint training and readiness events, JOINTEX 13 was created to further the CAF’s ability to conduct complex full-spectrum operations within a multi-national, coalition environment.  The exercise was designed to develop joint capabilities between the Army, Navy, Air Force and Special Operations, as well as prepare the 1st Canadian Division HQ for its future role in leading a Canadian Combined Joint-Inter Agency Task Force (CJIATF) HQ.  “I think the impressive part is how we did it,” said Colonel Ken Chadder, the exercise director for JOINTEX. “What we were trying to do was exercise within a synthetic environment, in a way that we need to do in the future: distributed across the country, integrating live, virtual and constructive activities.” ….”
  • More on the Canadian soldier who isn’t getting time off for a fundraising walk, both pro-soldier (the blog post) and anti-soldier (comments)
  • In two weeks, Medric Cousineau will leave his house in Eastern Passage and walk to Ottawa.  Cousineau and his post-traumatic stress disorder service dog, Thai, will walk the equivalent of about a half-marathon each day as the duo tries to raise awareness for the benefits of such animalsA former tactical co-ordinator on a Sea King helicopter, Cousineau has struggled ever since performing a dramatic rescue off the coast of Newfoundland 26 years ago. His life changed for the better when he received his service dog almost two years ago; he’s lost weight, reduced his medication and deals better with stress and anger.  Now Cousineau is trying to give back by raising money in an effort to buy 50 service dogs for 50 veterans in need. His walk will take him from Nova Scotia into New Brunswick and Quebec and on to Ontario, culminating on Sept. 19 in Ottawa.  Cousineau said he needs to raise about $350,000. Even before the journey has started, he’s already helped match two veterans with dogs and has others on a waiting list ….” – more here and here
  • Lieutenant-General Marquis Hainse assumed command of the Canadian Army from Lieutenant-General Peter Devlin (yesterday) in an official ceremony on Parliament Hill. The ceremony was attended by the Honourable Rob Nicholson, Minister of National Defence, and presided over by General Tom Lawson, Chief of the Defence Staff ….” - more here, here and here.
  • Aussies host Air Cadets from around the world (including Canada) on international exchange
  • The Supreme Court of Canada will issue a ruling Friday morning that could redefine how immigration officials decide if someone was complicit in war crimesThe case stems from a decision by the federal government to deny refugee status to Rachidi Ekanza Ezokola. He worked for the government of the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) for eight years, four of them as a prominent diplomat at the United Nations.  Ezokola moved to Montreal in 2008 with his wife and eight children, alleging he had received death threats from Congolese intelligence agents. Canada’s Immigration and Refugee Board denied Ezokola refugee status after finding him complicit by association in war crimes and crimes against humanity.  In the years Ezokola served the DRC government, it was responsible for a number of atrocities including the massacre of civilians and recruitment of child soldiers.  Ezokola appealed the ruling and won at Federal Court but then lost at the Federal Court of Appeal ….”

Written by milnewsca

19 July 13 at 7:45

MILNEWS.ca News Highlights – July 15, 2013

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MILNEWS.ca News Highlights – July 9, 2013

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Written by milnewsca

9 July 13 at 7:45

MILNEWS.ca News Highlights – July 2, 2013

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Written by milnewsca

2 July 13 at 7:45

MILNEWS.ca News Highlights – June 25, 2013

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Written by milnewsca

25 June 13 at 7:45

MILNEWS.ca News Highlights – June 11, 2013

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MILNEWS.ca News Highlights – June 10, 2013

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  • Afghanistan  There might also be a case to be made that she was working for Afghans, no?  “The letter that arrived at the home of a leading Afghan women’s rights activist in February 2012 was chilling. “Respected Adela Mohseni, you all the time betray religion and the Koran,” it began. Because she had ignored warnings and continued to “co-operate with infidels,” it said, she now faced death.  “After this, wherever our mujahedeen find you, it is obligated that they will sentence you to death and kill you in order to save our Islamic country.”  Such “night letters” are a common Taliban intimidation tactic, often producing deadly results for Afghans considered enemies of the fundamentalists. In this case, though, the message reverberated all the way to Canada.  Though not named in the letter, the “infidels” for whom Ms. Mohseni had been working were at a Canadian government-funded human rights institute. Since 2007, she had been employed in Kabul by Montreal-based Rights and Democracy, promoting legal reforms to protect the rights of women.  She went into hiding immediately after receiving the letter and then, on the advice of her superior at Rights and Democracy, fled with her family to India, seeking temporary refuge. Fifteen months later, she is still there, recognized as a refugee by the United Nations but unable to work, struggling to support her children and still fearing for her life.  “I was working for Canada, and they should support and secure me, but unfortunately they didn’t,” she wrote recently ….”
  • The Department of National Defence has been quietly spreading its wings and becoming a major torchbearer for Canadian diplomacy even as Canadian envoys stage rotating strikes and Foreign Affairs struggles to stay relevant.  Defence officials have been staging high-level meetings with foreign counterparts, spent millions of dollars more on foreign travel and hospitality and placed a greater emphasis on reaching out to non-traditional allies in recent years.  It’s all part of a dedicated strategy first launched two years ago and which has been steadily gaining steam – even as Canada’s traditional foreign service has wrestled with a diminished role and been told to focus on trade, trade and more trade.  National Defence would not make anyone available to talk about its Global Engagement Strategy, but internal documents obtained by Postmedia News show “defence diplomacy” to be a major focus in the post-Afghanistan era.  “This involves a broad spectrum of international activities by the defence team,” reads one briefing document prepared for Defence Minister Peter MacKay in March 2011, “from high-level engagement and visits, to international personnel placements, Canadian defence attaches, ship and aircraft visits, joint exercises and capacity-building initiatives.” ….”
  • The Canadian Army has suspended military operations in the vicinity of a tiny, uninhabited island off the coast of Greenland that has been the source of an ongoing spat between Canada and Denmark, Postmedia News has learnedAccording to documents obtained under access to information legislation, the former chief of the defence staff, Gen. Walter Natynczyk, issued a directive in September 2012 that ordered Canadian Forces’ “operations in the vicinity of Hans Island be minimized with the exception of search and rescue (SAR) or emergency operations.”  Hans Island, which is only 1.3 square kilometres, sits between Canada’s Ellesmere Island and Greenland. While a maritime border has been agreed upon since 1973, the land border has caused diplomatic tension over the years.”
  • Veterans Affairs staff are bracing for as many as 500 job cuts.  The third round of cuts in the department is rumoured to be planned for later this month, though the government will not confirm if this is the case.  The government eliminated 278 full-time positions by the beginning of May but still has 506 more to cut, according to the Union of Veterans Affairs Employees.  Union president Yvan Thauvette said staff expect notices to go out shortly after the House of Commons rises this month or before it resumes in September.  “Most of the time they don’t want questions to be asked, so that’s why they send the letters when the House is not sitting,” he said.  The department has also quietly killed a quarterly performance report card that measured how well services were being delivered. The corporate performance reports also polled veterans on their satisfaction with the department.  The last report went out in November 2011, one month after the government confirmed it was planning to cut more than $200 million from the Veterans Affairs budget ….”
  • Results of an anonymous survey to be released in the fall by National Defence will shed more light on the extent of military sexual assault, including what has been called the silent crime of male-on-male rape.  Almost 68,000 troops, 86 per cent of them men, were asked last August to voluntarily complete the Canadian Forces Workplace Harassment Survey. It asks respondents their gender, years of service and rank, along with 100 questions ranging from personal harassment to whether they’ve ever been raped.  It’s the first time the military has done such a survey since 1998.  Results could provide valuable insight into the extent of military sexual violence — an issue that former soldiers and frontline social workers say is rarely reported. The extent to which men in the military are sexually attacked by other men is even more cloaked in silence, they say ….”
  • One blogger’s analysis of the Green Party’s stance on Canadian defence
  • A gay British soldier says Prince Harry rescued him from a homophobic attack by infantry members during a training exercise in Canada.  Trooper James Wharton became the target of abuse in 2008 after bragging about ‘‘scoring’’ with a fellow soldier.  ‘‘I think I’m about to be murdered by the infantry,’’ Trooper Wharton told Prince Harry who was his tank commander at the time.  After hearing the story the third-in-line to the throne reportedly declared: ‘‘Right, I’m going to sort this s**t out once  and for all.’’  ‘‘Harry climbed out of the tank and started having a go,’’ Trooper Wharton, who was then 21, writes in a book extract published in British tabloid The Mail on Sunday.  ‘‘He wasn’t holding back. Prince Harry was sticking up for me and putting a stop to the trouble.  ‘‘I had been on track for a battering and had been rescued.’’  Trooper Wharton, who quit the army earlier this year, writes that after hosing down the 2008 incident Prince Harry told him: ‘‘I  told those other lads to back the f**k off.’’ ….” – more in the Daily Mail piece here
  • Reports that U.S. authorities have been trawling for data from the biggest companies on the internet have so rattled Canada’s Privacy Commissioner, she’s seeking clarity from the country’s cryptologic agency to find out what this means for CanadiansStories Thursday in the Guardian and the Washington Post detailed the U.S. National Security Agency‘s PRISM program – warrantless intelligence-gathering that ostensibly targeted foreigners and reportedly involved collecting personal information from the servers of willing companies. All the participating companies listed have vehemently denied any knowledge of the program, which a U.S. government spokesman has called ”among the most important and valuable intelligence information we collect.”  “The scope of information reportedly being collected raises significant concerns,” Scott Hutchinson, a spokesperson for Privacy Commissioner Jennifer Stoddart, said in an email.  “Going forward, we plan to express our concerns to and seek information from the Commissioner of the Communication Security Establishment to determine how the personal information of Canadians may be affected.” ….” – more on the PRISM program here, more on Canada’s approval of some of the work here, some media commentary here and here, and some commentary from a former CSIS dude here
  • The federal government says it will allow an Ottawa man accused of terrorist ties to have a mobile phone, but balks at the idea of giving Mohamed Harkat access to the internet or removing his electronic tracking bracelet.  In documents filed with the Federal Court, the government says it is also open to dropping a requirement that Harkat get prior approval before travelling out of town.  The concessions would ease current release conditions for Harkat, but fall short of the full list of freedoms he will seek Tuesday during a one-day Federal Court hearing.  It has been more than a decade since Harkat, a refugee from Algeria, was arrested under a national security certificate on suspicion of being an al-Qaida sleeper agent — an accusation he denies.  He has essentially been living under house arrest with stringent conditions for seven years ….”
  • On his way to becoming Canada’s top cop, Bob Paulson told internal reviewers the national security certificate process for detaining suspected terrorists was “completely off the rails,” newly released documents showIn an interview with an auditor examining the controversial program, Paulson, now RCMP commissioner, expressed concerns about excessive state secrecy in certificate proceedings.  The national security certificate is a seldom-used tool for removing non-citizens suspected of terrorism or espionage from Canada.  “In my view, we over claim the protection of sources and methods and this is convenient if you can get away with it,” say notes from the October 2009 interview, recently released under the Access to Information Act.  Paulson was assistant RCMP commissioner for national security at the time of the interview. Two years later, he was picked by the Harper government to become commissioner ….”
  • A bomb threat that forced one of the Canadian Cancer Society’s biggest fundraisers to cancel on Friday night is still being felt by other groups organizing their annual walks and runs this weekendHalifax Regional Police said someone called 911 from a payphone at the corner of Spring Garden Road and South Park Street and made threats that alluded to the Boston Marathon bombing.  Nearby, nearly 700 people were gathered at the Oval in the Halifax Common for the Relay for Life.  Police met with the organizers and the fundraiser was called off, ruining a year’s worth of work by dozens of volunteers ….”

MILNEWS.ca News Highlights – June 7, 2013

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  • Afghanistan (1)  More from one of the senior officers on the ground (via the Info-machine) “Since I last wrote, much, as they say, has changed. We have moved from our beloved home at Camp ALAMO and now occupy quarters on nearby Camp BLACKHORSE, a much larger base with an already large contingent of fellow Canadians and other coalition partners. In accordance with higher-level decisions, Camp ALAMO has been handed over to an agency of the Government of the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan (GIRoA). In a brief ceremony in the Camp ALAMO Dining Facility, where our military family enjoyed many a good meal and good company, the necessary transfer documents were duly co-signed by U.S. Army Brig. Gen. Hall, Commander, Task Force CENTURION, and a GIRoA representative, with yours truly, Commander, Kabul Military Training Centre (KMTC). Before this, we also held a short ceremony at Camp ALAMO to mark the end of tour advisor presence at what many of us felt, and still believe, was the best camp in the mission ….”
  • Afghanistan (2a)  A fourth-generation solider who served in Afghanistan said he felt compelled to disobey orders and speak out about his experience as an injured veteran, regardless of the consequences he may face.  Vancouver-native Cpl. Glen Kirkland barely survived a Taliban ambush in the Zhari district of Afghanistan five years ago, and said he fears he’ll have no pension when he’s discharged, or be given adequate assistance for covering his medical bills for a long list of injuries.  The 29-year-old recalled the terrifying attack during a parliamentary hearing on Wednesday.   “My tour was one of bloodshed, constant fighting and on the second last day of my tour, my platoon was ambushed by an estimated 120 Taliban fighters,” an emotional Kirkland recalled.  He said the rocket that hit his vehicle missed him by “inches.”  Three of the five soldiers in the vehicle died in the attack.  “I had to pull myself while on fire, and through gunfire, to try to extract my dead and dying brothers-in-arms.”  The attack, Kirkland said, resulted in the loss of 75 per cent of his hearing, the loss of some sight and a brain injury that left him forever dependant on insulin.  “I suffer from PTSD (post-traumatic stress disorder) so badly that I haven’t been able to visit my home in Vancouver for years,” he said, with tears in his eyes. “I can’t handle the anxiety of being around crowds. Survivor’s guilt haunts me every day.”  Kirkland recalled the phone call he made to his father while in the hospital in Afghanistan.  “My dad said, ‘Don’t worry, Canada will take care of you,’” he said. “My dad was wrong.”  Kirkland said he had aspirations of becoming a police officer, but his injuries have dashed that dream.  He said he’s been denied certain medical aids upon returning to Canada.  “I cried,” he said. “Not like a person in pain, but as a person who is totally and utterly defeated.”  Kirkland said he’s been told to remain quiet about his experience after returning from battle.  “In the past I’ve been threatened with a dishonourable discharge,” Kirkland told CTV News ….”
  • Afghanistan (2b)  Defence Minister promises soldier who spoke to Parliamentary Committee will not face sanctions and receive all benefits – this from Question Period yesterday“I have sought and received assurances from the Department of National Defence, from our military, that he will receive every and all benefits to which he is entitled.  I will go further and commit to him and his family that he will suffer no ramifications for his testimony. We need to hear from veterans like Corporal Kirkland, and as well he will not suffer any consequences from coming forward.  In addition to that, he will continue to serve as long as he decides to serve in the Canadian Armed Forces …. Hon. Peter MacKay (Minister of National Defence, CPC):  Putting aside the usual feigned outrage from the member opposite, Mr. Speaker, this is now in Hansard so it is in writing.  I will repeat: Corporal Kirkland is a Canadian hero, is courageous for coming forward, but more important than that, he shed blood in the service of his country.  He will of course receive the proper benefits. He will of course suffer no consequences, and will continue to serve in the Canadian Forces as long as he decides ….”
  • The class action lawsuit filed against the federal government on behalf of disabled soldiers compensated under the New Veterans Charter is now underway …. On May 31, 2013 the government filed its Notice of Application, and Written Arguments.  These documents are on the Equitas Society web – site, and appear to take an aggressive stance against the disabled soldiers’ position …. The representative disabled soldiers, through their legal counsel Miller Thomson LLP, are required to provide a written response to the governments’ motion to strike out their application for a class action law suit (by 14 Jun 13) ….” – more in a thread over at Milnet.ca here (DISCLOSURE:  I’m a moderator over at Milnet.ca)
  • More D-Day anniversary info-machine material from the PM, the Veterans Affairs Minister and the group that went to France
  • Three Kingston-class Maritime Coastal Defence Vessels will be conducting coastal operations and training off the coast of British Columbia until end July. As part of their scheduled port visits, the three warships will also visit Prince Rupert, B.C. and participate in the 35th Annual Seafest from Jun 7-9 ….”
  • More on HMCS Toronto’s big drug bust here and here
  • Many entry points to Canadian Forces bases are now without guards during the day as part of security changes related to budget cuts hitting the Department of National Defence Sources told CBC News more than 60 commissionaires, who controlled access to dockyard gates, have been let go, and some of the sites will be looked after by an expanded duty watch of military personnel.  Documents obtained by CBC News through the Access to Information Act revealed eight officers and a civilian made 38 recommendations earlier this year about how to continue guarding the gates to various DND sites.  Those recommendations were redacted in the document.  The people who attended the January meeting on reducing the operations and maintenance budget at CFB Halifax were warned to be discreet.  “[The chair] reminded all present that because of the nature of this meeting, the contents of this meeting were not be discussed outside or with anyone other than attendees of this meeting,” the documents state.  In Halifax, Stadacona’s main gate is unguarded, as is CFB Shearwater ….”
  • The two main unions representing the 2,000-member civilian workforce at CFB Esquimalt asked members to boycott Wednesday’s annual barbecue to honour civilian employees at the baseBoth the Public Service Alliance of Canada and the Union of National Defence Employees urged their members to stay away from the event, hosted by Rear-Admiral Bill Truelove, that celebrates Public Service Week.  Capt. Jennifer Jackson of base public affairs didn’t give an estimate of attendees or say if the turnout was affected.  “The people who were there seemed to be really enjoying themselves,” she said.  This is the first time the unions have boycotted the barbecue, said Mark Miller, vice-president of UNDE.  “We’ve got these workforce-adjustment announcements, or layoffs, that have been coming out nationwide, as well as our collective agreement being undermined. We’re saying there’s no way we can be seen as being appreciated when we’re being kicked around,” Miller said ….”
  • Old business cards weren’t the only things thrown out when the federal government returned the Canadian Army’s old name recently. Song sheets weren’t far behind.  The Canadian Army adopted a new official march, entitled The Great Little Army, that it feels not only better reflects the land force’s size and character, but is more catchy to boot.  Official marches are important touchstones of a military unit’s identity, and are often played during special events and occasions such as military parades.  The army’s old official march Celer Paratus Callidus, which is Latin for “quick, clever and ready,” was adopted in 1968 when the army was merged with the air force and navy, and renamed Land Force Command.  Despite being the official march for 45 years, Canadian Army spokeswoman Colleen McGrann said Celer Paratus Callidus “is neither particularly tuneful or easily recognizable, and thus has not become embedded in the army’s culture.”  When the federal government restored the army’s old name in August 2011, commanders saw “an ideal opportunity to clearly identify a new army march,” McGrann said ….”
  • In what is being called a first in Canada, a rainbow-coloured Pride flag is to be raised at an Alberta military base Friday in a ceremony to be attended by senior officers and civilian members of the GLBT community Master Warrant Officer John McDougall made the request for the flag-raising a few weeks ago through the military chain of command at Canadian Forces Base Edmonton.  McDougall, who is a company sergeant-major in a field medical unit, said he was surprised when his request was quickly granted.  He said times have changed since he joined the army as a private 23 years ago.  “This is a huge turnaround from what used to be. When I first joined, I would never even consider telling anyone that I was gay. It just wasn’t macho,” he said.  “To be at the stage now where it is not only recognized and accepted and tolerated, but the base commander of the one of the largest bases of Canada is willing to have that flag put up, it is just an amazing feeling.”  The Pride flag, a symbol for gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgendered people, is to be flown near the base headquarters building for one week to coincide with Edmonton’s Pride festival ….”
  • In a new Policy Update from CDFAI, University of British Columbia post-doctoral fellow David S. McDonough asks whether or not Canada should rethink its involvement in Ballistic Missile Defence by focusing on four myths that surround the debate ….” – more in the full document (10 page PDF) here
  • Construction of the new HMCS Hunter building is on schedule says the commanding officer.  Work began on the new $16 million project last fall.  It will be a state of the art facility built on port authority land at the foot of Mill Street with a 60-year lease.  “It’s obviously going to be … located right here on the water, which is terrific for us,” said Dan Manu-Popa, Commanding Officer, HMCS Hunter. “It gives us the flexibility and the access both to conduct training and conduct on-water response, should we be tasked to do so.”  HMCS Hunter is currently located in downtown Windsor.  The new facility is not only good for Armed Forces but also good for the Olde Sandwich Towne area, too. It’s anticipated to be a shot in the arm for a business area losing so much lately.  The west end will also get a new park on a parcel of Port Authority land at the foot of Mill Street ….”
  • Way Up North  “The World Arctic Forum (Thursday) Announced the Opening of Their Offices in Toronto, Ontario, Canada ….”
  • No idea why the Veterans Affairs Minister was asked to provide a quote on new proposed new rules for establishing safe injection sites
  • So, is THIS (or here or here if the first link doesn’t work) what the PM’s new plane is going to look like?  Here’s some discussion over at Milnet.ca on the PMO’s idea of painting one of the CF’s planes in non-CF colours?  More from media here and here

MILNEWS.ca News Highlights – June 6, 2013

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Written by milnewsca

6 June 13 at 7:45

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